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The Colorado Department of Agriculture (CDA) reminds veterinarians and rabbit owners that reporting suspected occurrences of Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease (RHDV2), including sudden, elevated numbers of rabbit deaths, is mandatory. Disease reports are identified by the county of occurrence only,  and all other personal information is protected from open record requests. "This disease is very contagious and fatal to domestic and wild rabbits,” said State Veterinarian and CVMA member Dr. Keith Roehr. “The appropriate response by rabbit owners is vital to limiting further spread of the disease from affected rabbit facilities." The USDA...

In need of cloth masks for your team or clients to wear? Scrubin Uniforms, CVMA's newest Member Discount Provider, is offering customized unisex face masks for hospitals and their teams. Scrubin also offers a variety of workwear and uniform options for you and your team. All Premium CVMA members receive a $50 credit to spend in the Scrubin store! Learn more: colovma.scrubin.com/home.cfm (passcode cvma303).     Scrubin Uniforms is a CVMA Member Discount Provider....

The Colorado Department of Agriculture distributed this communication on May 12, 2020. The Colorado Department of Agriculture (CDA) and Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) have confirmed cases of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus type 2 (RHDV2) in feral rabbits near Calhan, CO, about 35 miles northeast of Colorado Springs, and in a cottontail in rural Prowers County. RHDV2 is highly contagious and lethal among rabbits. It does not affect humans or domestic species other than rabbits and is not related to COVID-19. RHDV-2 is considered a foreign animal disease and is of high...

Read below for a message from the Colorado Veterinary Medical Reserve Corps (CO VMRC) to all Colorado veterinarians. As communities, we are all affected by the current pandemic. We are seeing a surge of work that needs to be done, particularly in medical fields. To this end, The Colorado Veterinary Medical Reserve Corps (CO VMRC) program provides veterinary professionals and animal emergency responders with the training and credentialing necessary to support animal health and public health emergency response. Our local communities, under the strain of these unique circumstances, are looking for medical...

On April 22, the CDC announced the first confirmed cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection in two pet cats in New York. These are the first pets in the U.S. to test positive for SARS-CoV-2. What is SARS-CoV-2? SARS-Cov-2 is a novel coronavirus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a respiratory illness that can spread from person to person. Human patients with COVID-19 have experienced mild to severe respiratory illness, including fever, cough and shortness of breath. While much is currently unknown about this organism, no evidence suggests that animals can spread...

The Colorado State Veterinarian's Office distributed this communication to Colorado veterinarians on April 20, 2020. The Colorado Department of Agriculture (CDA) in conjunction with Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) has confirmed a case of Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus Serotype 2 (RHDV2) in wild cottontail rabbits in Costilla County.  This is the first confirmed case of RHDV2 in Colorado. On April 15th, CPW was notified of a report in Costilla County of several wild cottontails found dead.  Three cottontail rabbits were collected and samples from these rabbits were sent to the Foreign Animal...

The Colorado State Veterinarian's Office distributed this message on April 10, 2020. The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic H7N3 avian influenza (HPAI) in a commercial turkey flock in Chesterfield County, South Carolina. This is the first confirmed case of HPAI in commercial poultry in the United States since 2017. It appears this HPAI strain mutated from a low pathogenic strain that has been found in poultry in that area recently. There are currently no cases of HPAI...

On April 15, Governor Polis issued Executive Order 2020 038 to suspend certain statutes and rules to expand the health care workforce for hospitals and other inpatient treatment facilities due to COVID-19. Click here to read the governor's full order. How does this order impact veterinarians? Veterinarians and a number of other licensed health care professionals are temporarily permitted to be cross trained to assist in the COVID-19 response. The order directs DORA to develop emergency rules to allow for an expansion of health care workers to assist in the...

The Colorado State Veterinarian's Office distributed the following announcement on April 15, 2020. On April 13, 2020, the National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) in Ames, Iowa, confirmed a finding of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection (Indiana serotype) on an equine premises in Dona Ana County, New Mexico. A single horse on the index premises has met the case definition of infection with compatible clinical signs and virus isolation positive results. A second equine premises in Sierra County, New Mexico subsequently met confirmed VSV case definition with compatible clinical signs and reverse...

The Colorado State Veterinarian's Office distributed this message on April 14, 2020. RABBIT HEMORRHAGIC DISEASE VIRUS Serotype 2 (RHDV2) Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas have recently reported cases of RHDV2 in domestic rabbits, wild cottontails, and jackrabbits. Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus Serotype 2 is a highly contagious and fatal disease of domestic rabbits and wild rabbits of the genus Oryctolagus. This disease is considered a foreign animal disease (FAD) and is of high concern at the state and federal levels. The recent involvement of wild cottontails and hares is of particular concern. Clinical signs: Many...

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